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Seasonal wildfire preparedness tips

Making your property wildfire-ready involves year-round maintenance. Each season brings different tasks to help reduce wildfire risk, from managing vegetation to strategic tree planting and removal. See what you can do season-by-season to protect your property below.

Winter: Dormant season maintenance

  • Tree assessment: Inspect your property for dead or diseased trees.
  • Tree removal: Winter is ideal for removing hazardous trees and underbrush, weather permitting.
  • Tree trimming: Increase vertical clearance by trimming trees. If winter conditions prevent this, plan for spring action.
  • Spring planning: If you intend to plant trees, choose locally native species and plan their locations.

 

Spring: Preparing for dry conditions

  • Defensible space: Clear dead vegetation and create a buffer zone around your home.
  • Pest management: Remove trees affected by pests to prevent spread. Be mindful of insect activity that increases in summer.
  • Wood disposal: Remove or cover cut wood to avoid attracting beetles and other pests. Keep it away from healthy trees.
  • Tree watering: In dry periods, water valuable trees sparingly, following best practices.
  • Tree planting: Spring is a good time to plant new trees, provided there’s enough water.

 

Summer: Peak wildfire season vigilance

  • Ongoing removal: Continue removing dead or unhealthy trees.
  • Pest watch: Monitor for tree pest activity, which peaks in summer.
  • Fire safety: Exercise extreme caution with outdoor equipment to prevent sparks.
  • Fall planting prep: Plan for fall tree planting, focusing on native species.

 

Fall: Pre-rainfall tree care

  • Optimal planting time: Plant new trees when cooler temperatures and fall rains improve soil moisture.
  • Underbrush clearance: Remove dead trees and dense underbrush to reduce wildfire fuel.
  • Selective watering: Water valuable trees only if rainfall is below average. Overwatering can be harmful.

 

Reduce your fire risk by removing dead trees

For more detailed guidance on managing tree mortality and reducing fire risk, download our comprehensive guide.

trees in a mountain landscape